News & Media

July 27, 2015

Supercomputer simulation of process of coarsening of bubbles

Outline

Many people are familiar with the way tiny bubbles form in a bottle of champagne when it is opened and the pressure falls, but then gradually coalesce into larger bubbles. This simulation shows this process, called the Ostwald ripening process, in which larger bubbles grow at the expense of smaller ones. The simulation was performed using molecular dynamics based on as many as 13.7 billion atoms, using all of the more than 80,000 nodes of the K computer. This huge simulation allows us to investigate the interactions between bubbles in the Ostwald ripening process in detail.

RIKEN news: How the physics of champagne bubbles could lead to better turbines

Press release by AIP publishing: How the physics of champagne and soda bubbles may help address the world's future energy needs

Scientists

Hiroshi Watanabe
Research Associate
The Institute for Solid State Physics
The University of Tokyo

Masaru Suzuki
(Then) Research Associate
Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering
Kyushu University

Hajime Inaoka
Research Scientist
Discrete Event Simulation Research Team
RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science

Nobuyasu Ito
Associate Professor
Department of Applied Physics
School of Engineering
The University of Tokyo
Team Leader
Discrete Event Simulation Research Team
RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science

Credit

H. Watanabe, ISSP, the University of Tokyo and H. Inaoka, RIKEN AICS